Los Angeles
1932 1984
Garmisch-Partenkirchen
1936
Berlin
1936
St. Moritz
1948
London
1948 2012
Helsinki
1952
Cortina d'Ampezzo
1956
Melbourne
1956
Rome
1960
Innsbruck
1964 1976
Grenoble
1968
Mexico City
1968
Montreal
1976
Lake Placid
1980
Moscow
1980
Sarajevo
1984
Calgary
1988
Seoul
1988
Albertville
1992
Atlanta
1996
Sydney
2000
Athens
2004
Turin
2006
Beijing
2008
Vancouver
2010
Sochi
2014
Rio
2016

reset filters Back to overview

Calgary 1988

Christa Luding-Rothenburger became the only female athlete ever to win medals in the Winter and Summer Games in the same year. Representing the GDR, she won gold in the 1,000 m speed skating in Calgary, followed by silver in the sprint cycling in Seoul. Four years later, she wore the colours of the reunified Germany in Albertville and won her fifth Olympic medal.

ANECDOTE

Chinook, Eddie the Eagle and Cool Runnings

“Chinook” is the magic word in the Canadian province of Alberta. This warm fall wind, which is named after an American Indian tribe and blows in from the Pacific, can lead to dramatic temperature fluctuations in the space of a few hours. A temperature difference of 38 degrees was once recorded in Calgary. It was therefore understandable that, as had previously occurred in Sarajevo, the Alpine skiing events were postponed four times in all. “Whenever we went to Nakiska, the water was 10 centimetres deep at the end of the course and we had to turn around again having achieved absolutely nothing,” remembers Peter Hürzeler. It would have been tolerable if the accommodation in Calgary and the ski resort in the Rockies had not been 93 km apart. What the locals considered a welcome change to the cold winter weather was not such good news for the organisers of the Olympic Winter Games.

The unpredictable weather also affected the bobsleigh competitions, since sand was blown onto the track, and the ski jumpers. Wind speeds of 97 km/h were recorded when the large hill jumping competition was due to begin. This would have been too dangerous, not only for Eddie Edwards. “Eddie the Eagle”, as the short-sighted Briton was nicknamed, was the focus of as much attention during the Calgary Games as the Jamaican bobsleigh team, whose adventures were later made into a film called “Cool Runnings”. Edwards did not quite make it that far. The “worst ski jumper in the world”, as he was also known, jumped 55 m twice on the normal hill and 71 m and 67 m on the large hill in Calgary, 47.5 m and 40 m less than Olympic champion Matti Nykänen (FIN). He therefore scored no distance points at all. With 57.5 points, he finished 53.3 points behind secondlast place. The winner, Nykänen, scored a total of 224.0. The FIS prevented Edwards from entering the following year’s World Championships they did not want any more clowning around on and around the hills so they introduced minimum criteria that participants had to fulfil.

Nowadays, there is a three-stage competition system in ski jumping. Anyone who fails to score any points in the second stage, the Continental Cup, is not allowed to participate in the Olympic Games. There will never be another “Eddie the Eagle”.

TECHNOLOGY

First games with computerised timekeeping

Calgary and Seoul were the first Olympic Games with computerised timekeeping. The most sophisticated pieces of equipment did not just measure, allocate and print out times, they also stored in their memories the information that was needed for an understanding of the sport itself. OMEGA had now developed a colour video matrix board, which measured 14 x 9 m in the Olympic stadium in Seoul. Swiss Timing transported 707 items and 51 tonnes of equipment to Asia. Some of it was bought by the South Koreans after the Olympic Games. OMEGA once again received an award from the IOC for “outstanding services”: a statuette with the five Olympic rings.


close

Language

twitter,facebook,googleplus,linkedin en-US
close